Self cam

Beddard did however briefly mention other methods, including the "alluring coloration" of the flower mantis and the possibility of a different mechanism in the orange tip butterfly.

The book explained how disruptive camouflage worked, using streaks of boldly contrasting colour, paradoxically making objects less visible by breaking up their outlines.

Non-military use of camouflage includes making cell telephone towers less obtrusive and helping hunters to approach wary game animals.

Patterns derived from military camouflage are frequently used in fashion clothing, exploiting their strong designs and sometimes their symbolism.

In his 1890 book The Colours of Animals, he classified different types such as "special protective resemblance" (where an animal looks like another object), or "general aggressive resemblance" (where a predator blends in with the background, enabling it to approach prey).

His experiments showed that swallowtailed moth pupae were camouflaged to match the backgrounds on which they were reared as larvae.

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