No dating zone in campus

It's totally normal to have certain standards for those you pursue romantically.But if you have a feeling that none of your current dating strategies are turning out the way you want them to then, there's no harm in trying a new approach and dating out of your comfort zone.”Everyone has their dating comfort zone: a collection of wants and needs that, when met, minimize the angst and pressures that come from dating," Chris Armstrong, relationship coach and owner of Maze of Love, tells Bustle.For instance, I was in denial about having a type but I realized that my “type” or “comfort zone” are guys that are tall, lightskin/brownskin, “pretty boy” but in the sense of being able to dress.Despite these efforts, there are still a lot of misunderstandings about policies, procedures, and best practices.spoke with four sexual assault experts — Jane Stapleton, researcher and co-director of Prevention Innovations at the University of New Hampshire; Tracey Vitchers, communications coordinator for Students Active for Ending Rape (SAFER) and director of development at Sexual Health Innovations; Farah Tanis, co-founder and executive director of Black Women's Blueprint; and Laura Dunn, founder and executive director of Surv Justice — about the current rules, what's still missing for survivors and where schools should be putting their efforts.And they should expect their institution to do primary intervention, including bystander intervention.

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The referendum hides behind a facade of “human rights” activism.

More than 50 colleges and universities are under investigation for sexual violence issues, leaving students concerned and administrators scrambling for a solution.

The investigations are coming after a series of high-profile campus assaults and pressure from survivors' groups spurred the Obama administration and national politicians into action.

The report promoted campus climate surveys, engaging men, having comprehensive response policies when a student is assaulted, improving Title IX enforcement, and making enforcement efforts more transparent.

The administration also launched Not Alone.gov, a website full of resources and data for students, parents, and administrators.

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